Missouri Weekly Hay Summary - Week ending 08/24/2018

Friday, August 24, 2018

The drought might still be continuing but moods were extremely better this 
Week. Although the drought monitor showed only slight improvement, rains 
from last week have continued and it seems as most everyone has 
gotten at least an inch or two of rain now.  Combined with some cooler 
temperatures, many producers were surprised at how much green has appeared in 
fields.  There is a possibility for some fall pasture but a lot will depend 
on if farmers have any way to relieve some grazing pressure to give the 
stressed grass a chance to grow a little, as it is unlikely to pace grazing 
pressure. This sure doesnÂ’t change the fact hay is in short supply but it 
might mean a few less or lighter days feeding before any snow falls. There is a 
lot of corn that is being chopped or baled as grain yields are too low to 
shell. This will provide some extra forage to the market but along with any 
CRP or late baled hay, anyone feeding needs to be at least mindful of the 
possibility of high nitrate levels.  Many may have heard of the hay auction 
that was held last weekend in Southwest Missouri, as there was a lot of talk 
leading up to it because that is just not something that this state is used to 
seeing, unlike neighboring states where there are several weekly hay auctions. 
Attendance was good with both spectators and buyers as many showed up with 
trailers hooked to their pick up hoping to have the winning bid. Over 1000 
large round and large square bales and over 400 small square bales sold in the 
truest form of price discovery possible, a live auction and price levels were right 
in line with those in this report this last few weeks. Hay supplies are light. 
Demand is very good Hay prices are steady to firm. The Missouri Department of 
Agriculture has a hay directory available for both buyers and sellers. To be 
listed, or for a directory visit http://mda.mo.gov/abd/haydirectory/ for 
listings of hay http://agebb.missouri.edu/haylst/ (All prices f.o.b. and per 
ton unless specified and on most recent reported sales price listed as round 
bales based generally on 5x6 bales with weights of approximately 1200-1500 lbs).

Supreme quality Alfalfa (RFV <185) 180.00-250.00
small squares 7.00-9.00 per bale
Premium quality Alfalfa (RFV 170-180) 160.00-200.00
Good quality Alfalfa (RFV 150-170) 120.00-160.00 
small squares 5.00-7.00 per bale
Fair quality Alfalfa (RFV 130-150) 100.00-120.00 
 
Good quality Mixed Grass hay 100.00-200.00
Small squares 5.00-7.00 per bale (some alfalfa/grass mix)
Fair to Good quality Mixed Grass hay 80.00-150.00
small squares 4.00-5.50 per bale
Fair quality Mixed Grass hay 40.00-75.00 per large round bale 

Good quality Bromegrass 120.00-150.00
Fair to Good quality Bromegrass 60.00-100.00

Wheat straw 2.00-6.00 per small square bale



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Table 1: Alfalfa guidelines (for domestic livestock use and not more
         than 10% grass)
Quality      ADF     NDF      *RFV     **TDN-100%  **TDN-90%     CP
Supreme      <27     <34       >185        >62         >55.9     >22
Premium    27-29   34-36    170-185    60.5-62     54.5-55.9   20-22
Good       29-32   36-40    150-170      58-60     52.5-54.5   18-20
Fair       32-35   40-44    130-150      56-58     50.5-52.5   16-18
Utility      >35     >44       <130        <56         <50.5     <16

*RFV calculated using the Wis/Minn formula.
**TDN calculated using the western formula.
Quantitative factors are approximate, and many factors can affect
feeding value. Values based on 100 % dry matter (TDN showing both 100% 
& 90%).  Guidelines are to be used with visual appearance and intent of 
sale (usage).
=======================================================================
Table 2: Grass Hay guidelines
          Quality           Crude Protein Percent
          Premium             Over 13
          Good                   9-13
          Fair                   5-9
          Low                Under 5

Quantitative factors are approximate, and many factors can affect feeding
value. Values based on 100% dry matter. End usage may influence hay price
or value more than testing results.
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Hay Quality Designations physical descriptions:

Supreme: Very early maturity, pre bloom, soft fine stemmed, extra 
         leafy.  Factors indicative of very high nutritive content. 
         Hay is excellent color and free of damage.

Premium: Early maturity, i.e., pre-bloom in legumes and pre head in
         grass hays, extra leafy and fine stemmed-factors indicative of
         a high nutritive content.  Hay is green and free of damage.
 
Good:    Early to average maturity, i.e., early to mid-bloom in legumes
         and early head in grass hays, leafy, fine to medium stemmed,
         free of damage other than slight discoloration.
 
Fair:    Late maturity, i.e., mid to late-bloom in legumes, head-in 
         grass hays, moderate or below leaf content, and generally 
         coarse stemmed. Hay may show light damage.

Utility: Hay in very late maturity, such as mature seed pods in legumes
         or mature head in grass hays, coarse stemmed. This category
         could include hay discounted due to excessive damage and heavy
         weed content or mold.
=======================================================================


Source: MO Dept of Ag-USDA Market News Service, Jefferson City, MO
        Tony Hancock, Market Reporter, 573-751-5618
        24 Hour Recorded Report 1-573-522-9244
        www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/JC_GR310.txt